Summer School in SMC

The Sound and Music Computing summer school promotes interdisciplinary education and research in the field of Sound and Music Computing. It is aimed at graduate students working on their Master or PhD thesis, but it is also open to any person carrying out research in this field.

While the two first editions the Summer School (Genova 2005 and Barcelona 2006) were sponsored and organized by the S2S² EU project, from then on they are self-maintained and organized in the context of the SMC Conference.

The 2014 Summer school will be in Athens, Greece, right before the SMC/ICMC Conference, between the 11th and 14th of September 2014. It is organised by the Music Informatics and Cognition Research Group, Department of Music Studies, and the Department of Informatics and Telecommunications of the University of Athens. 

Genova 2005

Summer School in Sound and Music Computing

July 25 - 29, 2005
InfoMus Lab - DIST - University of Genova
Genova, Italy

Organized by the 6th Framework Programme IST FET Open Coordination Action S2S² Project

Schedule

Monday 25:

Control Session

9:00 - 9:15 - Welcome Address

09:15 - 10.45 - Presentations

  • Gesture in interaction: expressive control strategies, G.Volpe (DIST) , R.Bresin (KTH)
  • The interactive book, D.Rocchesso, A. De Gotzen (VIPS)

10:45 - 11:00 - Coffee break

11:00 - 13:00 - Invited speakers

  • New trends in Dynamic Instrumental arts: Enactive design, A. Luciani (INPG, Grenoble, France)
  • Tangible Acoustic Interfaces for Computer-Human Interaction, (the TAI-CHI Consortium)

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - 17:00 - Workshop: One to many or Many to one: Mapping strategies for the future

  • Presentation, R. Bresin (KTH)
  • Demonstration: Home conducting, A. Friberg (KTH)
  • Opponent, E. Bigand (LEAD)
  • Discussion

Tuesday 26:

Music Session

09.00 - 10.45 - Presentations

  • Making Sense of Sound and Music: An artificial intelligence View, G. Widmer (ÖFAI)
  • Sound and Sense: historical and philosophical view point, M. Leman (IPEM)
  • Musical Creation and Technological Innovation, N. Bernardini (MIU-FT)
  • Musical Learning and new technologies, E. Bigand (LEAD)

10.45 - 11.00 - Coffee Break

11:00 - 13:00 - Invited speakers

  • The Music Access Problem, F. Pachet (Sony CSL)
  • Music and research in the 21st century, T. Myatt (University of York)

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - 17:00 - Workshop: Creativity and Innovative Technology

  • Presentation, M. Leman (IPEM)
  • Focus on Music similarity in:
    • Interactive Systems, F. Pachet (Sony CSL)
    • Music Information Retrieval, G. Widmer (ÖFAI)
    • Music Composition, T. Myatt (University of York)
  • Opponent, N. Bernardini
  • Discussion

Wednesday 27:

Audio Session 1

09.00 - 10.45 - Presentations

  • Content-based Audio Processing, X. Serra (UPF)
  • Physics-based Sound Synthesis, C. Erkut (HUT)
  • Sound Design and Auditory Displays, P. Polotti (VIPS)
  • Auditory Perception/Cognition: Cochlea to Cortex - A. de Cheveigné (ENS)
  • Interactive sound, F. Avanzini (DEI)

10.45 - 11.00 - Coffee Break

11:00 - 13:00 - Invited speakers

  • Perception and recognition of sounding objects, S. McAdams (McGill University)
  • title Audio Engineering in Music Information Retrieval, M. Sandler (Queen Mary, University of London)

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - 17:00- Workshop:Application of auditory models in audio DSP

  • Presentation, A. de Cheveigné (ENS)
  • Demonstration: Real-time auditory processing based on auditory models, D. Pressnitzer, D. Gnansia (ENS)
  • Opponent, G. De Poli (DEI)
  • Discussion

Thursday 28:

Audio Session 2 and FET session

09:00 - 12:00 - Workshop: Physics-based sound synthesis of plucked string instruments

  • Presentation, V. Valimaki (TKK)
  • Demonstration, H. Penttinen (TKK)
  • Opponent, D. Rocchesso (VIPS)
  • Discussion

12:00 - 13:00 - General discussion/informal demos

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - 17:00 - Future and Emerging Technology session (invited speakers)

  • Intentional attunement: neural mechanisms of intersubjectivity., V. Gallese (Universita di Parma)
  • Architecture of Dissonance, R. Pierantoni
  • Vision-graphics convergence techniques for immersive videoconferencing, E.Trucco (Heriot-Watt University)

Friday 29:

Roadmap session

09:00 - 12:00 - Toward a Research Roadmap

  • Keynote speaker David Vernon (CAPTEC Ltd., EC Vision Network)
  • S2S²: report on the first year activities, N. Bernardini, D. Cirotteau (MIU-FT)
  • Merging and future collaborations
  • Critical evaluation of the summer school (UPF)

 

Steering Comittee

Local Organizing Committe

  • Antonio Camurri
  • Ginevra Castellano
  • Roberto Chiarvetto
  • Barbara Mazzarino
  • Francesca Sivori
  • Ilaria Vallone
  • Gualtiero Volpe

Registration

People interested in attending the 1st S2S2 Summer School are required to register by sending an e-mail to info-summerschool@s2s2.org

The e-mail should include the following information:

Title
First names
Family name
Organisation/Department
Street/PO Box
Postal Code
City
Country

Other contact information (fax, telephone), if available.
Web page, if available

The email should also include a short curriculum highlighting research interests and the reasons for participation. The steering committee will select participants depending on such information.

Note that participants are asked to actively contribute to the preparation of the school, for example by sharing material using the Internet infrastructure of S2S2.

Registration must be performed on or before May 1st, 2005. The Steering Committee decisions on confirmation of registration will be made on or before May 15th, 2005.

Registration Fees



Participants from the S2S2 partners and from other participating EU project (EU IST TAI-CHI, ENACTIVE, HUMAINE and ConGAS)

Free
External participants 200 Euro

 

Dates

Registration June 25, 2005
First Confirmation of registration June 15, 2005
Second Confirmation of registration June 30, 2005
S2S2 Summer School July 25-29, 2005

Barcelona 2006

Summer School in Sound and Music Computing

Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Barcelona, Spain
July 24-28, 2006

This Summer School is organized by the S2S² project and the Music Technology Group of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, with the goal to promote interdisciplinary education and research in the field of Sound and Music Computing. The School is aimed at graduate students working on their Master or PhD thesis, but it is open to any person carrying out research in this field.

This is the second Summer School organized by S2S², last year it took place in Genova.

Teachers

Invited experts

Program

Application

Registration fee

Travelling

Social events

Venue

Report

Teachers

Invited Experts

Academic Program

The lectures are designed to be of interest to any graduate student or researcher in the field of Sound and Music Computing. The topics chosen for this year are Interface Design and Music Cognition; relevant topics in our research fields which have particular methodologies and research strategies. The lectures will present these particular methodologies and their application in Music related problems.

All the participating students will give short presentations on their current research. The emphasis will be given to methodological and context issues. Thus each presentation should emphasize the methodological approach chosen and the scientific, technological and industrial context of the research. The discussions will give feed back to the students that should be useful for the continuation of their research.

The main topic of the summer school will be the Roadmap on Sound and Music Computing that is being written as part of the S2S² project. There will be special lectures by invited experts and discussions on two major parts of the Roadmap, the industrial and the cultural contexts of the field. In particular the focus will be given to the academic research and both its relationship with the industrial exploitation and its use in contemporary music production. The resulting discussions will contribute to the roadmap.

Program schedule:

 
Monday 24th
Tuesday 25th
Wednesday 26th
Thursday 27th
Friday 28th
9:00
Music Cognition
Henkjan Honing

Interface Design
Bill Verplank

Music Cognition
Henkjan Honing

Workshop:
Industrial context for Sound and Music Computing

Moderator: Xavier Serra

11:00
Coffee break
11:15

 

Interface Design
Bill Verplank

Music Cognition
Henkjan Honing

Interface Design
Bill Verplank

13:00
Lunch
14:00
Scientific context of research
Moderator: Alain de Cheveigné


Presentation by students

Social context of research
Moderator: Nicola Bernardini


Presentation by students

Industrial context of research
Moderator: Vesa Valimaki


Presentation by students

Critical evaluation and discussion
about the summer school
Moderator: Roberto Bresin
15:45
Coffee break
16:00

 


Discussion

Discussion


Discussion

Workshop: Towards a shared and modular curriculum on SMC
Moderator: Giovanni de Poli

Visit to the Music Technology Group, Universitat Pompeu Fabra

17:00

PhD defense

21:00
 

Banquet

Concert

Concert

Concert

 

Student presentations (15 minutes each):

Scientific context: Monday 24th of July

Social & Cultural context: Tuesday 25th of July

Industrial context: Wednesday 26th of July

Workshop: Social and cultural context for Sound and Music Computing
Workshop: Industrial context for Sound and Music Computing

Application

A maximum of 20 students will be admitted to the school. The candidates will be evaluated by the teachers and the application should include the following documents in pdf format:

Students have to send their applications to Xavier Serra before May 1st. Notification of acceptance will be given no later than May 15th.

For people not wishing to make research presentations during the school, a brief curriculum vitae is sufficient and the deadline for application is June 30th.

These people should also send their applications to Xavier Serra or Emilia Gómez.

Registration Fee

The regular registration fee is 300 €. This fee also covers the costs for lunch and various evening social events.

The registration fee for students is 200 €. This fee also covers the costs for lunch and various evening social events.

There will be a few student scholarships that will cover the registration fee.

The deadline for registration is June 30th.

Traveling and Accommodation

Participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation. University dorms are available at a special rate. For additional information contact Cristina Garrido.

Social events

Venue


Stockholm 2007

Summer School in Sound and Music Computing

KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Stockholm, Sweden
July 2-6, 2007

This Summer School is organized by the Music Acoustics Group of the KTH in Stockholm, with the goal to promote interdisciplinary education and research in the field of Sound and Music Computing (SMC). The School is aimed at graduate students working on their Master or PhD thesis, but it is open to any person carrying out research in this field.

This is the third SMC Summer School. The first two were organized by the S2S² Coordination Action, last year it took place in Barcelona and two years ago in Genova.

Teachers

Invited
experts

Program

Application

Registration
fee

Travelling

Social
events

Venue

Teachers

Invited Experts

Academic Program

The lectures are designed to be of interest to any graduate student or researcher in the field of Sound and Music Computing. The topics chosen for this year are Neurosciences and Music and Mobile Music and Locative Audio Technology; relevant topics in our research fields which have particular methodologies and research strategies. The lectures will present these particular methodologies and their application in Music related problems.

All the participating students will give short presentations on their current research during a speed-talk of four minutes. The emphasis will be given on research questions and particularly on methodological issues related to their research project. Students will receive a written feedback from the teachers that should be useful for the continuation of their research.

All the participating students will present a poster about their PhD work. The posters will be on show for all the duration of the Summer School, with discussions during coffee breaks.

All students will work on mini-projects focusing on the themes discussed during the Summer School. Results of the mini-projects will be presented on the final day of the School. Mini-projects will give the opportunity for hands-on activities such as testing software tools or planning of experiments.

Final program schedule:

!

 
Monday 2nd
Tuesday 3rd
Wednesday 4th
Thursday 5th
Friday 6th
8:00

 

Registration

 
9:00
Neurosciences and Music

 

Elvira Brattico

Neurosciences and Music

 

Minna Huotilainen


The Future Sessions

 

The future of music: What do we need? How will it be?

 
10:00

 


Sound and Music Computing in Europe
Part 1

Current EU projects in the SMC field

 

 

11:00
Coffee break & Poster presentations
11:15
Neurosciences and Music

 

Minna Huotilainen


The Future Sessions

 

The future of music: What do we need? How will it be?

13:00
Lunch
14:30
Speed talks

 


Short 4 min presentations by students

Speed talks

 


Short 4 min presentations by students

Speed talks

 


Short 4 min presentations by students

Mini-projects final presentations by students

15:30

 

Coffee break & Poster presentations
16:00

Mini-projects final presentations by students

18:00

 

Get together drink!
 
19:00
     

Banquet

 

Neurosciences and Music

July 2nd, 9:00-11:00
Main research topics in the neurosciences of music
Elvira Brattico, PhD, Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Dept of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland
Abstract Main research topics in the neurosciences of music: modularity, musical vs. language syntax and semantics, lateralization of brain functions for music, auditory cortex plasticity, brain structures devoted to musical performance and music emotions.

July 3rd, 11:15-13:00
Methods of brain imaging research (slides in PDF)
Minna Huotilainen, PhD, Docent, researcher, Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Dept of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland

July 4th, 9:00-11:00
The development of musical abilities (slides in PDF)
Minna Huotilainen, PhD, Docent, researcher, Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Dept of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland

Mobile Music and Locative Audio Technology

Lalya Gaye, PhD, Viktoria Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden
July 2nd, 11:15-13:00
July 3rd, 9:00-11:00
July 4th, 11:15-13:00

Click here for suggested reading

Part I

Part II

Speed Talks

In a maximum of 4 slides in total (remember that you will have 4 minutes for your presentation) present your research questions/problems/crazy ideas/etc. on which you would like feedback from those present.
A printout of your slides will be available to the participants. Please notice that presentations longer than 4 slides will not be accepted!!!
Download here the powerpoint file with the instructions and the official format for the slides.

Poster presentations

Students are invited to present a poster about their research work.
Download here the powerpoint file with the instructions and the official format for the poster.

Hands-on sessions: Mini-projects

Download here the PDF file with the list of proposed mini-projects. Students can also propose alternative projects.

The Future Sessions, Thursday July 5th

 

The future of music: What do we need? How will it be?

9:00 Semi-parametric audio coding - Today and beyond (slides in PDF format)
Jonas Engdegård, Senior Research Engineer, Coding Technologies
Abstract By the time AAC (Advanced Audio Coder, the format used in e.g. iTunes music store) was standardized in 1997, the audio coding research community felt they had nearly reached the limit of how efficient a perceptual audio coder can be. However, the development of the last decade has resulted in large, unexpected improvements, mainly because of the introduction of semi-parametric audio coding tools. The by now widely spread aacPlus format, which is the successor of AAC, is based on a flexible approach of employing parametric tools such as Spectral Band Replication (SBR) and Parametric Stereo (PS) in combination with a waveform coder (AAC).
This presentation will give a quick tutorial on perceptual audio coding including an overview of how the last decade's addition of technology has contributed to today's state of the art codecs, and a future outlook in the field of audio coding.

9:40 The future of music software (slides in PDF format)
Ernst Nathorst, CEO of Propellerhead Software
Abstract Now that inexpensive computers are powerful enough to deliver a complete professional audio production and DSP can provide faithful renderings of practically any instrument we can imagine – where do we go from here? What are the next steps that music software needs to take in order to serve musicians better than today?

10:20 The future of music on mobile devices
Staffan Ljung, Strategic Product Manager for Music, Ericsson
Abstract Mobile music is arguably the most requested service by end consumers currently. The sales of mobile music has during the last 2 years had a tremendous impact on the over all digital music sales and the business is just taking its first steps out from the starting blocks.
However, we need to remember that this is still an immature business where stakeholders eventually need to adapt their business models in order to ensure market growth. In all business it would me a major mistake not to listen to what the end consumer expects wants and needs. The end user experience is a focus area where I think that most players in this segment have a lot of improvement to do. One part of the user experience is the " in-store" experience, a building brick which constantly is evolving due to a a bigger variety of choice in the stores, more professional recommendation engines, end consumer offerings etc. However the end user experience does not stop once the end consumer has bought a product from the store. Actually you could argue and say that it begins at that exact point in time. Therefore interoperability is one of the key hurdles that needs to be managed over the next years. How is this realised? What have Ericsson learnt out the past years in this area?

11:00 Coffee break

11:20 Independent music production
David Åström, Kocky/Soul Supreme
Abstract After a short presentation of the music I produce, I will discuss how modern music technology, both equipment and distribution, affects the artistic and creative process of music production. Some of the relevant issues in music production will be discussed. How is the role of the producer changing when advanced hardware and software tools are readily available to the consumer? How do different studios choose different equipment setups? How is the relationship between recording musicians and producers affected by advances in music technology?

12:00-13:00 Panel discussion

Each students will:

Genova 2008

Summer School in Sound and Music Computing 2008

Casa Paganini-InfoMus Lab, Genova, Italy, June 9-11, 2008

This Summer School is organized by Casa Paganini - InfoMus Lab in Genova, Italy, with the goal of promoting interdisciplinary education and research in the field of Sound and Music Computing (SMC). The School is aimed at graduate students working on their Master or PhD thesis, but it is open to any person carrying out research in this field.

This is the fourth SMC Summer School. The first two were organized by the European Project Coordination Action IST-FET S2S² (Sound to Sense – Sense to Sound) in Genova (2005) and Barcelona (2006). Last year the Summer School took place in Stockholm.

Teachers / Scientific Committee

Academic Program

This year the SMC Summer School is held in connection with the NIME08 Intl. Conference. The participating students will have free access to the NIME Workshops on June 4 and June 8, including oral presentations and discussions by experts from industries and by leaders of EU funded projects in the field of Sound and Music Computing. The participating students will also benefit of the reduced student fee for admission at the NIME08 Conference (June 4-7).

Lectures are designed to be of interest to any graduate student or researcher in the field of Sound and Music Computing. The topics chosen for this year are Gesture and Music - Embodied Music Cognition, Mobile Music Systems and Active Music Listening, relevant topics in our research fields, which have particular methodologies and research strategies. The lectures will present these particular methodologies and their application in music related problems.

All the participating students will give short presentations on their current research during a speed-talk of four minutes. The emphasis will be given on research questions and particularly on methodological issues related to their research project. Students will receive a written feedback from the teachers that should be useful for the continuation of their research.

All the participating students will present a poster about their PhD work. Posters will be on show for all the duration of the Summer School, with discussions during coffee breaks.

All students will work on mini-projects focusing on the themes of the Summer School. Results of the mini-projects will be presented on the final day of the School. Mini-projects will give the opportunity for hands-on activities such as testing software tools or planning of experiments. The organisers will prepare materials for small projects involving the EyesWeb XMI open software platform (www.eyesweb.org) on the topics of the school.

Lectures by Xavier Serra

On the first lecture we will briefly overview the research in Sound and Music Computing by reviewing some historical references and by identifying some current challenges. The second lecture will present some topics on sound synthesis and processing and the last lecture will go over the topic of sound and music description. The lectures will try to explain the technological and conceptual ties that exist between some of the current trends in sound generation for music applications and the techniques for content based sound retrieval. Quite a number of the techniques being worked on for sound retrieval come from the field of sound synthesis and at the same time the new developments in retrieval are being applied and are inspiring new directions in the development of sound generation systems. There will be a special emphasis on the ties between gesture and sound, the current trend towards embodied cognition approaches in sound analysis and synthesis and the current technological possibilities for developing active listening applications. To explain all this examples from the work carried out at the Music Technology Group will be used, such as the research on spectral based concatenative synthesis and on sound and music retrieval. Also the work on the freesound.org sound community will be presented, showing the potential that this open and shared resource has for the research on sound retrieval and for experimenting with new sound generation systems.

Seminars

The school program includes three seminars:

Students' posters and speed talks

Registration and Information

Register here. Registration deadline: May 15, 2008.

Students are requested to submit their posters on or before the registration deadline. The regular registration fee is 200 €. This fee also covers the costs for lunch and various evening social events. The registration fee for students is 150 €. This fee also covers the costs for lunch and various evening social events. Payment will be cash at the registration desk.

For more information on the program and on how to apply, please contact: smc08@casapaganini.org

Porto 2009

Porto skyline

Interacting with sounds of Porto

2009 Summer School in Sound and Music Computing & SID Training School on Interactions with Environmental Sounds

Casa Da Música , Porto, Portugal, July 18-21, 2009

The 2009 Sound and Music Computing Summer School is organized as a Training School of The COST IC0601 Action on Sonic Interaction Design (SID). The theme of this summer school is Interacting with Sounds of Porto. This summer school explores the potential of recording, processing, sharing and interacting with city sounds.

This is the fifth SMC Summer School (after the Genova and Barcelona editions funded by the European Coordination Action IST-FET S2S² and later editions in Stockholm and Genova again) and the second Training School of the COST Action on Sonic Interaction Design. It takes place just before the 6th Sound and Music Computing Conference.

This Summer School aims at giving an opportunity to young researchers interested in the field of Sound and Music Computing to showcase their ideas, learn new skills and work with senior researchers. The School caters to suit different student backgrounds. If your background is an Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Music, Art, Sound recording, Design, etc., there is something new for you to learn at this Summer School.

Academic program Blog TeamApplicationRelated links Travelling and Accomodation


Academic program

During 4 days, the program includes lectures, as well as hands-on practical sessions under the supervision of tutors who provide one-to-one mentoring on artistic and/or scientific projects focused on interactions with sounds that reflect the city of Porto and its activities.

Lectures and hands-on practical sessions take place in the Digitopia installations in the Casa da Musica.

Speed talks and poster sessions are also organized for students to give an overview and receive feedback on their current research, and to foster scientific cross-fertilization.

The summer school includes 3 main lectures:

  1. Design of new interfaces for musical expression. This lecture reviews existing examples of novel interfaces for musical expression (also known as gestural controllers or control surfaces), as well as the various sensing technologies used in these devices. We will also discuss ways to design mapping strategies between interface output variables and sound synthesis input variables and approaches to the design of novel interfaces and digital musical instruments. Course material.
  2. Registering the soundscape. This lecture presents basic aesthetic, technical, and cultural aspects of audio field recording, interactive approaches to sound design with environmental sounds, and the nature of the roles that soundscape composition can play in our lives.
  3. Sound edition, description and retrieval, social networks. Present current technologies for sound edition, description and retrieval, and introduce students to the use of the Freesound.org platform with which they will edit, tag and share their sound recordings. Slides of presentations.
In practical hands-on sessions, participants, alone or in small groups, are asked to record environmental sounds related to their project, to describe these sounds and upload them to Freesound.org. Using the obtained sonic material (which can be complemented with other sounds), the participants are asked, under supervision of tutors, to develop artistic and/or scientific projects.
Projects are defined in accordance between students and summer school tutors.
A blog provides an interactive communication channel between teachers and students (e.g. for daily description of project developments, and/or teaching and learning experiences), and it serves as a dissemination forum of the school's achievements.

Universidade Católica Portuguesa certifies 3 ECTS to the summer school students.

Preliminary schedule

 Saturday 18/07
Sunday 19/07Monday 20/07 Tuesday 21/07
10:30Lecture 1
Lecture 1 Lecture 1 Lecture 1
11:30Coffee break & poster presentationsCoffee break & poster presentations
Coffee break & poster presentations Coffee break & poster presentations
12:00Lecture 2
Lecture 2 Lecture 2 Lecture 2
13:00Lecture 3
Lecture 3 Lecture 3 Lecture 3
14:00LunchLunchLunchLunch
15:00Tutor presentations
Student speed talks
Hands-on sessionHands-on sessionHands-on session
17:0017:20
Coffee break & tips on "How to move around Porto"
Coffee break & poster presentations Coffee break & poster presentations Coffee break & poster presentations
17:30Team building.

 

Hands-on session

Hands-on sessionProject presentation by students.
20:30Get together drink and dinner.   

 

Course material

Lecture 1:

E. R. Miranda and M. M. Wanderley. 2006. New Digital Musical Instruments: Control and Interaction Beyond the Keyboard. Middleton, WI: A-R Editions Inc. ISBN: 0-89579-585-X

Lecture 3:

Bram de Jong: slides from Freesound presentation

Xavier Serra: slides from presentations of days 2, 3, 4

Team

Coordination

Teachers

Tutors and proposed topics:

Application

The deadline for applications for the summer school has now passed, and notifications of acceptance have been already sent.

Applications did include the following documents in pdf format:

21 students have been selected by the Summer School team to participate in this year's summer school.

Admitted students are requested to bring a poster at the Summer School summarizing their research project.

For additional information, please use this form.

Deadline for applications: April 24th 2009 For sending your application, please use this form.

Notification of acceptance: May 12th

There is a student registration fee of 200 Euros to the Summer School (covering costs for meals, coffee breaks, 1 dinner, material, etc). The COST Action IC0601 on Sonic Interaction Design provides financial help to a selection of students under the form of individual fixed grants of 500 Euros. (preference is given to students whose proposal projects best fit SID topics -see here).

Summer School students are also encouraged to attend the Sound and Music Computing Conference (23-25th July 2009). A special reduced-price package is available to summer school students that grants assistance to all events between July 18-25 (the conference, tutorials and summer school). Click here for price details.

Travelling and accomodation

Participants must arrange their own travel and accommodation.
For more info on special rates hotels, traveling tips and local information, please see here.

 

Inspiration links

Thanks to Daniel Arfib, Karmen Franinovic, Stephan Baumann, Trond Lossius, Antti Ikonen, Ademar Aguiar and Michael Harding for links.

 

 

Barcelona 2010

The soundscapes of Barcelona

Title: Sound and Music Computing Summer School
Dates: July 17-20, 2010.
Place: Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain
Web: http://smcnetwork.org/summer_school/barcelona2010
Alternate web / Blog: http://soundscapesofbarcelona.wordpress.com
Contact: Please, fill this form.

The SMC Conference is the forum for international exchanges around the core interdisciplinary topics of Sound and Music Computing. Prior to the Conference there will be the SMC Summer School.

The goal of this Summer School is to give an opportunity to young researchers interested in the field to learn about some of the core interdisciplinary topics and to share their own experiences with other young researchers, through the study of the soundscapes of Barcelona. For that, we will use Freesound.org, a huge collaborative database of sounds, released under the Creative Commons Sampling Plus license.

The creation and study of the soundscape of Barcelona will be divided into different subtopics, covering all the required aesthetic and technical aspects for soundscape analysis and creation. For that, the program of the summer school is divided into lectures and hand-on practical sessions. 

The School caters to suit different student backgrounds and interests. If your background is an Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Music, Art, Sound recording, Design, etc., there is something new for you to learn at this Summer School.


Index


Academic program

Overview

The four days program includes lectures and hands-on practical sessions. The 3 main lectures cover the following topics:
  • Soundscape composition: Documentation, listening, and creation using computers: Acoustic ecology and Soundscape composition, by Barry Truax.
  • Sound and music content processing: Theory and applications of sound and music description, by Fabien Gouyon.
  • Introduction to recording techniques using handheld recorders: Technical concepts for recording and mixing audio in optimal conditions, by Enric Guaus.

The hands-on practical sessions cover the following topics:

  • Composition of Realistic and Interactive Soundscape: Analyse, record and annotate a target soundscape of Barcelona, in order to re-compose it, by Mattia Schirosa.
  • Augmented Soundscapes: Creation of augmented soundscapes, starting from recordings of real soundscapes, using realtime machine listening and signal processing techniques, by Stefan Kersten.
  • SMC Tales: Develop a mobile phone application for collaborative story telling, by Vincent Akkermans.
  • Tangilble interface for graph based music representation: Building a tangible interface for the music representation used in radio freesound, by Gerard Roma.

Schedule

Time Sat, 17th. Sun, 18th. Mon, 19th. Tue, 20th. Wed, 21th.
10:00 - 11:30   Lecture: Soundscape composition Lecture: Soundscape composition Lecture: Soundscape composition
11:30 - 12:00   Coffee break Coffee break Coffee break
12:00 - 13:30   Lecture: Sound and music content processing Lecture: Sound and music content processing Lecture: Sound aand music content processing
13:30 - 15:00   Lunch Lunch Lunch
15:00 - 16:30 Course presentation Sound Walk Projects Projects
16:30 - 18:00 Lecture: Sound Recording Sound Walk Projects Projects
18:00 - 19:30 Lecture: Sound Recording Projects Projects Projects Summer School Concert

More detailed information can be found in this Google Calendar

Course material

  • Lectures:
    • Soundscape Composition: Documentation, listening, and creation using computers: The World Soundscape Project (WSP) was established as an educational and research group at Simon Fraser University during the early 1970s, and documented soundscapes as part of an over-arching concern to draw attention to the importance of the sonic environment. R. Murray Schafer's definitive soundscape text, TheTuning of the World, and Barry Truax's reference work Handbook for Acoustic Ecology were outcomes of these early years, followed by Truax's publication Acoustic Communication that deals with all aspects of sound and the impact of technology. Inthe field of sonic design, the computer increasingly provides toolsfor dealing with both the basic material of sound composition, suchas granular synthesis, convolution and digital signal processing, and the creation of multi-channel soundscape compositions using recorded materials. Prof. Truax’s presentations will outline the background of acoustic ecology as an area of both scientific research and artistic endeavour, leading into a discussion of soundscape composition as an art form per se, ranging from the pioneering workof the WSP to contemporary compositional approaches to creative presentations of soundscape materials.
    • Sound and music content processing: The amount and availability of different media (professionally produced or user-generated content) is continuously increasing. This is profoundly changing the ways we interact with sound and music today and how we expect to do it tomorrow. Music Information Retrieval (MIR) is a fast-paced multidisciplinary field of research where different long-tradition disciplines (such as e.g. Signal Processing, Information Science, Computer Science, Musicology) meet to empower these changes. This lecture will provide an overview of MIR research, we will look into ways to extract semantic information from a number of media (from specific audio signals to contextual annotations). A special focus will be put on surveying state-of-the-art algorithms and available systems for the automatic description of music audio signals from a musical perspective (focusing on musically-meaningful dimensions, such as e.g. rhythm, harmony, timbre). We will explore diverse uses of this step of information extraction, such as music search and recommendation, music signal transformations or real-time music performance.
    • Sound recording: Not all the handheld recorders do the same. Not all the audio formats sounds equal. This lecture will provide the basic concepts of audio recording and microphone techniques to perform high quality recordings taking into account different aspects such as directivity, stereo techniques and portability.
  • Projects:
    • Composition of Realistic and Interactive Soundscape: The process focus on recording and annotation techniques to compose realistic virtual Soundscape using an MTG system for Soundscape interactive composition. There will be 4 phases: soundscape analysis and recordings, annotations and database creation, virtual soundscape composition, soundscape performance. The students will analyze on-site a target Soundscape, they will define relevant Sound objects, set-up and performs the recordings using shot-gun microphones. Then, in a second phase, they will annotate interesting segment through Sonic Visualiser, creating and preparing the soundscape database. Finally, they will creates the virtual SoundConcepts using the MTG system for Soundscape generation & composition, written in SuperCollider language. In the final performance the student will play the soundscape moving a listener around the virtual space and controlling the soundscape parameters defined during the annotations. The environment recordings will be held in acoustically interesting environment, such as the Cathedral, the Boqueria or St Antoni Marketplace, the Barceloneta beach, the kitchen of the Hostelería Hofmann school, a Factory. Note that when we speak about acoustically interesting environment we means both the sonic properties of the acoustic space (the Cathedral) and the scenographic properties of its actors: the presence of interesting sources producing a notable activity of aesthetically interesting sound events (the Marketplace, the Factory, a huge Kitchen).
    • Augmented Soundscapes: The capabilities of portable devices such as current generation mobile phones and media players is still severely limited in terms of computing power and storage space, such that only a subset of today's analysis and synthesis algorithms can be run in realtime. The goal of this workshop is to develop techniques and applications around the concept of augmented soundscapes according to the following assumption: What if we had available now the computing power of current desktop devices in a mobile package? Without the limitations of today's mobile technology, how would we design augmented reality applications? In this workshop we will create augmented soundscapes, starting from recordings of real soundscapes, that will be recorded by the participants during the first day of the workshop workshops. Using realtime machine listening techniques like onset detection, event extraction and segmentation, tempo tracking, etc. we will extract prominent features from real soundscapes. These features will be used to process and recompose the audio material with signal processing techniques such as granular resynthesis, concatenative synthesis, audio mosaicing and spectral modification. The processes to be developed by the participants can include --but are not limited to-- electroacoustic compositions, musically augmented soundscapes, auditory display and data sonification applications, etc. The goal of the workshop is to develop a single particular augmented soundscape in a small group, with the focus of presenting the results in a final concert or interactive performance.
    • SMC Tales: The goal of the 'SMC tales' workshop is to develop a mobile phone application for collaborative story telling. The phone will be used during the conference to extract from the visitors a story that they create together. The story is formed by adding a recording of a single sentence at a time. But before the story can be extended, the story teller is presented with the last five recordings in the story. They can then choose to advance the story in whatever way they want. After the new storyteller has recorded a sentence, he can transform his voice to a robot, a kid, an old woman, and other types of voices. When satisfied with the result, the recording, together with a picture of the storyteller, gps data, possibly any subjective annotations, is uploaded to a server. The resulting story can then be listened to by visiting the 'SMC tales' website.
    • Tangilble interface for graph based music representation: The purpose of this workshop is to build a tangible interface for the music representation used in radio freesound (http://radio.freesound.org). In radio freesound, a music composition is represented by a graph where nodes represent sounds, and edges represent transitions between sounds. This representation is aimed at collaborative composition based on a shared repository of sounds (freesound). Collaborative work, on the other hand, is one of the main applications of Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs). By representing sounds of the database as tangible objects, users will be able to discuss, manipulate and exchange compositions without the restrictions of a single-user computer interface. An example of this approach is tangible sequencer (http://www.tangiblesequencer.com/). Before the workshop, participants will have recorded, edited, labelled and uploaded their sounds to freesound. These sounds will be used to develop and test the interface.

Team

Coordination

Teachers

The faculty for the lecture sessions is:
  • Barry Truax is a Professor in both the School of Communication and the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University, Canada, where he has taught courses in acoustic communication and electroacoustic music. As a composer, he is best known for his work with the PODX computer music system that he has used for tape solo works and for pieces that combine tape with live performers or computer graphics. His music has been released on 8 solo CDs, including the double CD of his opera Powers of Two,and most recently Spirit Journies, a set of virtual soundscapes. In 1991 his work, Riverrun, was awarded the Magisterium at the International Competition of Electroacoustic Music in Bourges, France, a category open only to electroacoustic composers of 20 or more years experience.
  • Fabien Gouyon is Invited Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, in Portugal, and senior research scientist at the Telecommunications and Multimedia Unit of INESC Porto where he co-leads the Sound and Music Computing research group. His main research and teaching activities are in Music Information Retrieval and Music Pattern Recognition. He has published over 50 papers in peer-reviewed international conferences and journals, published a book on computational rhythm description, gave the first tutorial on the topic at the International Conference on Music Information Retrieval in 2006 and participated to the writing of the European Roadmap for Sound and Music Computing, published in 2007.
  • Enric Guaus is a researcher in sound and music computing at the Music Technology Group (MTG), Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), and at the Artificial Intelligence Research Institute (IIIA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). He obtained a PhD in Computer Science and Digital Communications in 2009 with a dissertation on automatic music genre classification. His research interests cover music information retrieval and human interfaces for musical instruments. He is assistant professor in audio and music processing at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) and lecturer un acoustics, electronics and computer science at the Escola Superior de Música de Catalunya (ESMUC).

Tutors for the hands-on practical sessions

The tutors for the practical sessions are:
  • Vincent Akkermans is a system architect at the Music Technology Groups (MTG, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF). He got his master's degree in Sound and Music Technology at Utrecht School of the Arts, in 2008. He got internships to work at the Patchingzone, STEIM, the Netherlands Architecture Institute, and the Music Technology Group (MTG). Currently, he is working at the MTG integrating the most recent technologies of the Web 2.0, advanced on-line tools for music creation, and large sound and music repositories.
  • Stefan Kersten is a is a researcher and PhD candidate at the Music Technology Group (MTG), Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF). His research focuses on sound texture modeling for analysis and synthesis and automated soundscape generation techniques. In his work with the DissoNoiSex collective, he explores the fringes of human interaction in interactive sound and video installations. He is an expert SuperCollider user, and has taught signal processing techniques in various workshops around the world.
  • Gerard Roma got involved in programming computers while searching for new sounds and musical tools. He is currently a researcher and Phd Candidate at MTG-UPF. His work focuses on computational models and techniques for collaborative music creation.
  • Mattia Schirosa is an Interaction Sound Design Researcher working at the Music Technology Group (MTG), Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF). He obtained the Cinema and Multimedia Engineer Master Degree in 2009, in Turin. He worked in several augmented reality productions for theatre, at the Music Technology research Lab, and in various media productions. His research interests focus on Soundscape exploration/composition and Acoustic Ecology research. He worked on the development of a software application written in SuperCollider.

Application

Important dates

  • Deadline for applications: Friday 30 April 2010
  • Notification of acceptance: Monday 17 May 2010
  • Deadline for Student's project submission: Friday 2 July 2010

Registration forms

Applications must include the following documents in pdf format:
  • Curriculum vitae (max. 1 page)
  • Proof of university enrollment.
  • Short description of the student research interest and motivation to participate (max. 2 pages)
The three pdf files must be incuded in a name_surname.zip file. The application must be sent using this form.

Fees

There is a student registration fee of 150 Euros to the Summer School. This fee covers coffee breaks and course material. This fee also grants the access to the SMC Tutorials for those students that also attend the SMC conference. This fee does NOT cover costs for meals.


Travelling and Accomodation

Location

The SMC Conference and the Summer School take place at the Communication Campus of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona.


See Communication campus - Poblenou on a bigger map

More information at the SMC Conference - Location web page.

How to arrive

To reach the Communication-Poblenou campus we recommend the public transport:

  • Subway: L1 - Glòries
  • Bus: 7, 92, 192, N7
  • Tram: T4 - Ca l'Aranyó

More information at the SMC Conference - How to arrive web page.

Accomodation

There is a large list of hotels, residences and apartments near the campus. Please, go to the SMC Conference - Accomodation web page.

Padova 2011

Summer School:

Embodied Sound and Music

Academic Program / Courses / Teachers / Application & Registration

The goal of the SMC Summer School is to give an opportunity to young researchers interested in the field to learn about some of the core interdisciplinary topics of SMC, and to share their own experiences with other young researchers. This year the focus is on the embodied links between sound, music, and movement. Lectures and hands-on projects will explore this theme from several viewpoints, including novel sound synthesis techniques, multimodal interaction, music cognition, movement analysis and characterization.
All the materials (slides, code, pictures, teachers, students, ...) are available at the Summer School wordpress page: http://smc2011summerschool.sampl-lab.org

Academic Program

Time Sat, 2nd. Sun, 3rd. Mon, 4th. Tue, 5th.
9:00 - 10:45 Lectures Lectures Lectures
10:45 - 11:15 Coffee break Coffee break Coffee break
11:15 - 13:00 Start 12:30 - Summer School &
Students Presentation
Lectures Lectures Lectures
13:00 - 14:30 Lunch Lunch Lunch
14:30 - 16:15 Presentation/Introduction Course 1 Projects Projects Projects
16:15 - 18:00 Presentation/Introduction Course 2 Projects Projects Projects

Courses

Music and Movement / Interactive SMC: The Challenges of Continuous Interaction

Course 1 - Music and Movement
Leon van Noorden (University of Ghent, Belgium)

Main Lectures
  • Ch1: The Embodied Link between Music and Movement
    Recent developments in Systematic Musicology put more emphasis on the link between action and perception in the experience of music. This is in line with the general trend in cognitive and neural sciences. The focus is on Embodied Music Cognition. Important are also the psychological and social aspects.
  • Ch2: Characterisation of Movement and Music and their Relation
    Although we argue in the previous chapter that music and movement are intimately linked, we take them now apart to study the features of each of them and to study how we can describe the linkages between them.The following topic will be Introduced: resonant and smooth motion, basic gestures, synchronisation and entrainment, the use of space and time, pulse and metrical structure.
  • Ch3: The Measurement and Registration of Music and Movement
    A presentation is made of the various possibilities to measure movement in and outside the lab. Accelerometers, Mocap systems, video and GPS and their raw presentation as data or avatar models will be discussed.
  • Ch4: Mathematical Tools for Movement Analysis
    In order to reduce the gigabytes of data obtained with the technologies described in the previous chapter to understandable models it is important to have good mathematical description and analysis tools. An important aspect is that the movements to music are very often quasi repetitive movements. Relevant recent methodologies such as Periodicity Transform and Empirical Mode Decomposition will be introduced.
  • Ch5: Some State of the Art Music and Movement Studies
    Walking to Music, Dancing the Samba, Resonance and Synchronisation in tapping to music by young children and movements made by musicians are relevant examples of the research on Embodied Music Cognition from the IPEM.
  • Ch6: Applications
    Many people, today, have small but sophisticated equipment in their pocket that can present music and measure movement. This opens the floor for many 'apps' that can apply our knowledge on Music and Movement. We suggest to have a brainstorm on innovative applications.

Hands on
Denis Amelynck (University of Ghent, Belgium)
Frank Desmet (University of Ghent, Belgium)

Projects
In the two hands on projects the participants will measure movements related to music listening or music making, analyse it with one of the mathematical models and present a model rendition of the movement in order to get hands on experience with the contents of the more theoretical lectures. The students will be able to propose experiments in which they are interested or choose one of the ideas we present.

Course 2 - Interactive SMC: The Challenges of Continuous Interaction
Federico Fontana (University of Udine, Italy)

Main Lectures
Digital sound synthesis relies on a number of techniques that accumulated during the last decades. Together with methods for audio and musical analysis and classification, they form a corpus that answers almost every sound researcher's and music practitioner's question. Unless, tight interaction constraints come into play. Once no more than 15-20 ms are allowed to transform interactive inputs such as human control into accurate auditory feedback, much of that corpus melts and instead leaves the stage to ad-hoc solutions, subsuming hardware dependency, application constraints, and various trade-offs that inevitably limit the quality and scalability of the solution. Far from providing a systematic approach to SMC in conditions of continuous interaction, the lectures will survey the diverse questions that need to be answered during a sonic interaction design project, both inside and outside the music field:
  1. Instantaneous Sonic Feedback: interactive musical and everyday sounds;
  2. Critical Design and Technological Issues;
  3. Case Studies in Musical Sound Synthesis;
  4. Case Studies in Everyday Sound Synthesis.

Hands on
Maurizio Goina (Conservatorio Tartini Trieste, Italy)
Stefano Papetti (University of Verona, Italy)

Projects
  • Natural sonic walking (Maurizio Goina - Conservatorio Tartini Trieste, Italy)
    The purpose of this workshop is the realization of an interactive installation in which the main idea is the exploration of the expressive potential of ecological sounds for gait sonification. The aim of such work is to stimulate the user’s sensitivity to ecological sounds through their embodiment, and, reciprocally, to enhance her/his proprioception through a continuous and interactive sonic feedback. The EGGS system Elementary Gestalts for Gesture Sonification will be used for the sonification of the walk, this by recognizing elementary kinematic units. The system is implemented as a Max/MSP application and a Processing applet. There will be three phases; theoretical and conceptual work, sketching, prototyping and realization. On the first day students will be introduced to the conceptual background of the EGGS system, will go trough a brainstorming session and produce concepts and vocal sketches. On the second day students will focus on sound design needed for the sonification of the walking, and will realize sketches in order to simulate the installation, by means of the EGGS system, graphics tablets and accelerometers. On the third day students will work on a full scale installation, applying and calibrating sensors to their legs, video documenting the system at work and discussing the results. An example of this type of installation is Sonic Walking.
  • Effects of sound and vibration in augmented walking tasks (Stefano Papetti - University of Verona, Italy)
    In everyday life, auditory and tactile cues coming from the feet provide significant information about the environment. Recent trends in HCI, performing arts and gaming, consider the use of foot-based multimodal interfaces, whose applications include augmented reality, rehabilitation, critical labor environments, navigation aids and entertainment. The purpose of this workshop is to let students investigate and experience the importance of auditory and tactile feedback in walking and other foot-related tasks. One or more pair of instrumented shoes will be made available (here's a previous prototype). Such shoes are provided with force sensors and audio-tactile exciters. Moreover, we will make use of a sensing floor enabled by contact microphones, which can track a person while walking. By interfacing such hardware devices with an open-source software for sound synthesis, students will be able to experience both auditory and underfoot tactile feedback simulating different grounds (from creaking floors to snow and mud). After exploring this setup, we will start a couple of pilot experiments to investigate the cross-modal effects of sound and vibration in walking scenarios.

Teachers

Leon van Noorden (University of Ghent, Belgium)
Education: PhD: Temporal Coherence in the Perception of Tone Sequences, TU Eindhoven, 1975; Technical Physics, TU Eindhoven, 1963-1970
Current activities: Research on music and movement; synchronisation in children, auditory scene analysis, walking of patients with Parkinson's Disease, rhythm perception and production. Functions: Associate professor, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Unité de recherche en Neurosciences Cognitives, 2009-present, Visiting professor, IPEM, University Ghent, 2005-present; European Commission, 1989-2004; Dutch PTT, 1981-1989; Dutch Association for the Blind, 1977-1981; Post Doctoral Fellow, Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, USA 1975-1976, ZWO 1970-1975.
Artistic: Construction of and performing with computer controlled musical instruments. Member of Maciunas Ensemble: 1972-present.

Denis Amelynck (University of Ghent, Belgium)
Denis Amelynk received a master degree in engineering at the University of Ghent in 1985. He worked as system and training engineer for several international companies like Alcatel, Honeywell and W.R. Grace. Machine Learning is one of his principal interests. Currently as PHD-researcher he makes his expertise available to the Institute for Psycho-acoustics and Electronic Music (IPEM) of the University Ghent. His most recent research concerns Bayesian Modeling of musical gestures providing musicologists with new insights in the embodied music recognition paradigm.

Frank Desmet (University of Ghent, Belgium)
Frank Desmet (Ph.D. Researcher, IPEM Ugent) is involved in the MEFEMCO project at IPEM on empirical methodologies for the analysis of listeners/musicians movements in response to music, using specific multivariate statistical paths. A broad spectrum of traditional statistical techniques, such as Time-Series Analysis, Multivariate Non-Parametric Analysis, Multivariate Analysis of Variance (GLM) and Multiple Regression Analysis, Principal Components Analysis, Procrustes Analysis and Multidimensional Scaling. Furthermore, advanced statistical methods, such as Dynamic Time Warping, Chaos Analysis, Cladogram Analysis and Analysis of Entropy are used to analyze complex data. Another tasks is to coach and train researchers at IPEM in Experimental Design, setup of datasets and provide guides to establish valid statistical pathways for the validation of experimental data.

Federico Fontana (University of Udine, Italy)
Federico Fontana is assistant professor at the Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica of the University of Udine, teaching sound processing. In 2001 he has been visiting scholar at the Laboratory of Acoustics and Audio Signal Processing, Helsinki University of Technology (now Aalto University) in Espoo, Finland. In 2003 he received the PhD in computer science from the Dipartimento di Informatica of the University of Verona, where he has been working until 2009, and where he currently teaches non visual interaction as a guest professor. He coordinates the EU FET-Open Project 222107 NIW - Natural Interactive Walking and the industrial project E-PHASE - Electronic Piano with Haptic And Spatial Enhancements. He has been guest editor of two special issues in international journals focusing on SMC. He has been scientific program chair of HAID 2010, in Copenhagen. In 2000-2003 he has been consulting for the R&D divisions of some companies and public institutions. His current interests are in the design and interactive synthesis of sounds, the evaluation of non visual interfaces, and in real time nonlinear signal processing.

Maurizio Goina (Conservatorio Tartini Trieste, Italy)
Maurizio Goina is a viola player and an audio-visual composer. He received a Master Degree in Music and New Technologies from the Conservatory of Trieste – Italy. He plays viola in the orchestra of the Trieste opera theatre. His audiovisual works were performed in many festivals in Italy, Europe and the Americas. Since 2008 he has been developing, together with Pietro Polotti, the EGGS system for gesture sonification. Currently, he is working as a researcher on a Gesture Sonification research project at the School of Music and New Technologies of the Conservatory of Trieste.

Stefano Papetti (University of Verona, Italy)
Stefano Papetti received a MSc in Computer Engineering from the University of Padova, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Verona, where he currently works as research associate on the EU-funded project NIW. His research focuses on sound synthesis, physical models of acoustic phenomena, ecological sounds, interactive sonification and sonic interaction design.

Application and Registration

Applications must include the following documents in pdf format:
  • Curriculum vitae (max. 1 page);
  • Proof of university enrolment;
  • Short description of the student research interest and motivation to participate (max. 2 pages).
The three pdf files must be included in a name_surname.zip file. The application must be sent by e-mail to smc2011@dei.unipd.it.